The Observatory

Australian carers need to put their eye health first

Julie Heraghty

This Macular Degeneration Awareness Week the Foundation commissioned an independent national Galaxy survey to understand if Australians aged 50 to 64 years, who care for ageing parents and grandchildren, were prioritising their eye health.

The results showed that 75 per cent of Australians aged 50 to 64 years are providing weekly care and support to older parents in some way and almost half (46 per cent) are supporting grandchildren.1

What the research highlighted is that carers are not making their sight a priority, with only six per cent of carers stating that an eye disease check was a top health priority for them.1

Carers are juggling family, possibly career and community activities, while trying not to let down those around them. However, they could be letting themselves down by not investing time in their own eye health.

We want Australians to be aware that macular degeneration is the country’s leading cause of blindness and severe vision loss. It’s usually related to ageing and most frequently affects people over 50 years of age.

In Macular Degeneration Awareness Week we want all Australians over 50 to have an eye test and macula check and contact the Foundation for a free information kit on 1800 111 709 or by visiting mdfoundation.com.au.

1 Consumer survey conducted by Galaxy Research, 2-6 March 2017, N = 1,012.

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About the Author

Julie Heraghty, CEO of the Macular Disease Foundation Australia.

Julie Heraghty

Julie Heraghty is CEO of the Macular Disease Foundation Australia. Read more by this author →

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